8 Steps To Pitching A Successful Video Concept

And other resources for producers

There is so much to think about when producing a film.

From people, to gear, to budget — it can be easy to lose track! And things only get more complicated the bigger the project, which is why film production scheduling is so important. A well-organized schedule is the first step to making a great film.

Below we have broken down the stages of scheduling for producers. Starting with script development and ending with locking down your production schedule. This list is the workflow many producers follow to ensure an organized and successful film shoot.

1. Script Development

There is so much to think about when producing a film.

From people, to gear, to budget — it can be easy to lose track! And things only get more complicated the bigger the project, which is why film production scheduling is so important. A well-organized schedule is the first step to making a great film.

Below we have broken down the stages of scheduling for producers. Starting with script development and ending with locking down your production schedule. This list is the workflow many producers follow to ensure an organized and successful film shoot.

2. Script Breakdown

Now that you have chosen a screenplay, you can begin the early stages of pre-production. Your first step as a producer is to complete an initial script breakdown. This means listing every element within your script that you need to gather before production begins.

By doing this you can create two things. First, a budget estimate, and second, a preliminary production schedule. The producer will complete the initial script breakdown, but other departments will conduct their own later. For example, the art department will do a script breakdown during pre-production by taking notes on props and set design.

As a producer, you will want to have an idea of what your entire production will cost to shoot as soon as possible. To do this, go through each scene at a time and create a list of every element. Elements are everything you can see in a scene from actors, to props and costumes. When all of your elements are listed, you can begin to see how many locations, significant props, and setups you will need.

You can do this with pen and paper or use script breakdown software. Some popular software is Studio Binder, Gorilla Software, Final Draft 11, and Movie Magic Scheduling.

8 Steps To Pitching A Successful Video Concept

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3. Budget Breakdown

Now that you have chosen a screenplay, you can begin the early stages of pre-production. Your first step as a producer is to complete an initial script breakdown. This means listing every element within your script that you need to gather before production begins.

By doing this you can create two things. First, a budget estimate, and second, a preliminary production schedule. The producer will complete the initial script breakdown, but other departments will conduct their own later. For example, the art department will do a script breakdown during pre-production by taking notes on props and set design.

As a producer, you will want to have an idea of what your entire production will cost to shoot as soon as possible. To do this, go through each scene at a time and create a list of every element. Elements are everything you can see in a scene from actors, to props and costumes. When all of your elements are listed, you can begin to see how many locations, significant props, and setups you will need.

You can do this with pen and paper or use script breakdown software. Some popular software is Studio Binder, Gorilla Software, Final Draft 11, and Movie Magic Scheduling.

Walkie Talkie Lingo - Cheat Sheet for Film Crew

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Amy Clarke

Amy is a film blogger based in Liverpool UK. She worked on numerous productions, working her way up from independents to major budget feature films. Amy now works as a blogger writing about the film industry. You can follow her work at amyclarkefilms.com

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